Once installed, sewers are not sexy or even visible, but they are an essential component of the project. Also, due to a scheduling problem, we couldn’t build the front porches on Kippendavie until the sewers were in.  After waiting way more than considered usual, the utility stake-out was finally done.  (It’s really important that you always call this free service, named ‘Call One’, to determine what is underneath your property. Even if you’re just digging a fence post, a gas leak is not a pretty thing. ) Therefore, the utility service company could now begin the installation of the new sewer and water service.  First, they dug up and capped the old services to the previous houses. Then, they installed the new sewer and water pipes.  The water main was on the other side of the street and the sewer is particularly deep, so it was a long day.

Meanwhile, the framers began working to build the porches.  This will reduce the need for scaffolding when the brick-work begins, and will allow the framers to complete the roof gable ends and turret roofs much more safely than if they were working off of scaffolding.

Fastening a deck to a building with brick veneer is a tricky problem.  You cannot bolt the wall ledger board to the veneer like you would on a foundation, and you also cannot brick around the joists as they will rot off eventually.  Therefore, we are using a product called a Maine Deck Bracket.  This poses a clever solution to this common problem; it is an H-shaped piece of aluminum that bolts to the building and to the joist header.  It leaves a 5-inch space to allow the bricks to pass behind the deck framing.

Inside, the plumbing contractor has been drilling dozens of holes, getting ready to install his piping.

Next week, we hope to finally have shingles installed, and to have the heating contractor begin his duct installation.

No Comments Yet.

Leave a comment

Unable to load the Are You a Human PlayThru™. Please contact the site owner to report the problem.